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A time transect of exomes from a Native American population before and after European contact

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
21 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
135 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
64 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
188 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
A time transect of exomes from a Native American population before and after European contact
Published in
Nature Communications, November 2016
DOI 10.1038/ncomms13175
Pubmed ID
Authors

John Lindo, Emilia Huerta-Sánchez, Shigeki Nakagome, Morten Rasmussen, Barbara Petzelt, Joycelynn Mitchell, Jerome S. Cybulski, Eske Willerslev, Michael DeGiorgio, Ripan S. Malhi

Abstract

A major factor for the population decline of Native Americans after European contact has been attributed to infectious disease susceptibility. To investigate whether a pre-existing genetic component contributed to this phenomenon, here we analyse 50 exomes of a continuous population from the Northwest Coast of North America, dating from before and after European contact. We model the population collapse after European contact, inferring a 57% reduction in effective population size. We also identify signatures of positive selection on immune-related genes in the ancient but not the modern group, with the strongest signal deriving from the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) gene HLA-DQA1. The modern individuals show a marked frequency decrease in the same alleles, likely due to the environmental change associated with European colonization, whereby negative selection may have acted on the same gene after contact. The evident shift in selection pressures correlates to the regional European-borne epidemics of the 1800s.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 135 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 188 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 3%
United Kingdom 2 1%
Brazil 2 1%
Canada 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 176 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 61 32%
Researcher 38 20%
Student > Bachelor 20 11%
Student > Master 15 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 4%
Other 24 13%
Unknown 22 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 71 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 43 23%
Social Sciences 18 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 4%
Environmental Science 5 3%
Other 15 8%
Unknown 28 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 303. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 May 2020.
All research outputs
#54,180
of 16,055,994 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#721
of 30,989 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,182
of 291,143 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#106
of 2,806 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,055,994 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 30,989 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 49.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,143 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,806 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.